Key learnings about women & enterprise from the Trust Women Conference 2016

By Miranda Barham, WAM Steering Committee

Cherie Blair moderates Women Entrepreneurs panel at Trust Women Conference, December 2016

  1. “The established way is not necessarily the best. If you want a different outcome, you need to do things differently. You need to be defiant.”

These were wise words from Professor Muhammad Yunus who talked to us about his experience in setting up Grameen Bank. He wanted to set up a bank for the poor, that lent to women. His contemporaries thought it could not be done. Prof Yunus looked at what the banks did that lent to the rich and he decided to do the opposite. Instead of pursuing contemporary banking models, he removed the need for collateral and created a banking system based on mutual trust, accountability, participation and creativity. More than thirty years later, Grameen Bank’s success has defied all those who told him he would not succeed. Not only has he created a successful bank in his home country of Bangladesh, but he has set up projects in 58 countries, including the US when in 2008, he created Grameen America. It now has 19 branches with over 85,000 borrowers. All the borrowers are women and the repayment rate is 99.5%. As Prof Yunus says to all those naysayers, “Trust women.”


Professor Muhammad Yunus makes the keynote speech on Day 2 of the Trust Women Conference

  1. Cherie Blair, human rights lawyer and founder of the Cherie Blair Foundation for Women told us that, “155 countries have a law that impedes women’s economic development.”

Mrs Blair quoted a World Bank report released in 2015 which analysed the legal restrictions to women’s employment in 173 countries. It found that 155 of these countries have at least one law impeding women’s economic opportunities and in 18 countries, husbands can legally prevent their wives from working.

The report goes on to say that lower legal gender equality is associated with fewer girls attending secondary school relative to boys, fewer women working or running businesses, and a wider gender wage gap.

  1. Women lead only 5% of global companies but in the UK, women lead 40% of social enterprises.

While women lead very few companies on a global basis, they are much more highly represented in the UK when it comes to leading social enterprises.

Servane Mouazan, Founder of Ogunte, a firm that offers coaching and services to women in social enterprises and their business support providers, felt that this is because traditionally women’s enterprise has been promoted in areas where women have been serving for some time, as members of the voluntary sector, as unpaid carers, or in roles where women have been ‘relegated’ for centuries – such as the domestic sphere and education. As women started to volunteer and professionalise, they have done so in areas where social enterprise businesses emerged, and hence are more likely to lead them than mainstream commercial businesses.

  1. Only 5% of venture funding goes to women.

Clearly this is a major hurdle for women entrepreneurs seeking funding for new ventures and is at odds with global intelligence network Thomson Reuters’ assertion that ‘companies run by women perform better’. If they perform better, it should be an obvious investment choice, which leads to the next point.

  1. There is a pervasive unconscious bias when it comes to women

The conclusion was that much greater awareness and education is needed to counteract what appears to be a pervasive unconscious bias towards women whether it is in gender stereotyping of the toys girls play with, attitudes at educational institutions or in the workplace.

Siobhan Reddy, co-founder and studio director of Media Molecule, told us that by age 12, women were already discouraged from pursuing a career in technology. Siobhan has made it a priority to seek and hire women in her high-tech business, which in the predominantly male sector of gaming, boasts 30 percent female staff and 26 different cultures. In pursuit of greater female empowerment, she has acted to address the unconscious bias in a whole range of ways from ensuring the inclusion of non-stereotyped female characters in games to discouraging her female colleagues from answering the phone, the door and making tea. No more ‘Polly put the kettle on’ here!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s